Gains for everyone

Do the anglophone and allophone communities of Québec have something to gain from Québec independence?

Of course! Anglophones and allophones are Quebecers too: they would gain from every benefit from which francophones stand to gain.

Full and complete control over decision-making that concerns all of us, no matter what language we speak, is the most important of those benefits. Right now, because of demographics, Canada can be governed without a single MP from Québec. That means even though 100% of Quebecers might be opposed to a policy being enacted, Ottawa can still “democratically” go ahead with it. Take environmental issues as an example. Currently, the Canadian federal government is approving the construction of pipelines across the country in order to support oilsands and Alberta’s economy. Quebecers are unanimous that they do not want the Energy East pipeline to be imposed upon Québec. When oil contaminates your drinking water, it’s irrelevant if you are an anglophone, allophone, or francophone; you’re affected in the exact same way. Yet all Quebecers, as part of a province, are powerless to stop the Energy East pipeline – but as a sovereign country, we could just say no!

Moreover, Montréal, which has the greatest concentration of anglophones and allophones in Québec, actually suffers from belonging to Canada, as the concentration of economic, political and cultural control grows in Toronto. As Jane Jacobs pointed out over 35 years ago, Montréal is slowly becoming a provincial town that is sort of a satellite to the country’s metropolis. However, should Québec become sovereign, all Montréalers would get to be proud to live in a splendid, unique, world-class metropolis.

Share